Waffles
by Madhavi
from Le Menagier de Paris.

Waffles [127] are made in four ways. In the first, beat eggs in a bowl, then salt and wine, and add flour, and moisten the one with the other, and then put in two irons little by little, each time using as much batter as a slice of cheese is wide, and clap between two irons, and cook one side and then the other; and if the iron does not easily release the batter, anoint with a little cloth soaked in oil or fat. The second way is like the first, but add cheese, that is,
spread the batter as though making a tart or pie, then put slices of cheese in the middle, and cover the edges (with batter: JH); thus the cheese stays within the batter and thus you put it between two irons. The third method, is for dropped waffles, called dropped only because the batter is thinner
like clear soup, made as above; and throw in with it fine cheese grated; and mix it all together. – The fourth method is with flour mixed with water, salt and wine, without eggs or cheese.

I looked through the Florilegium and couldn’t find where anyone had posted a redaction of this specific waffle description, so I thought I’d give it a shot.

6 eggs
1 full teaspoon of salt
1.5 c Riesling
3 c all-purpose flour
Oil
½ lb brie, with rind, thinly sliced

Whisk eggs with wine until frothy. Add flour and salt and beat until smooth. Heat waffle iron and oil it. Pour about 1/3 c batter in each side, quickly add a few slices of brie, cover with another ¼ to 1/3 c batter, close the lid. Cook until they start to color.

I was surprised and pleased that these waffles both rose well (with no leavening!) and tasted so damn good. This recipe made 12 waffles, which I cut into fourths. I served these waffles warm at our Baronial winter holiday feast with grilled pears sprinkled with fine spices. This was a test recipe for Trimaris St. George’s Faire in April.

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